CELESTE YARNALL ON FADE TO BLACK FEB 23RD

CELESTE YARNALL ON FADE TO BLACK FEB 23RD CELESTE YARNALL ON FADE TO BLACK FEBRUARY 23RD 2016 Celeste Yarnall, PhD began as a model, spokesperson, and actress fresh out of high school. She was discovered by Rick and Ozzie Nelson while … Continue reading

Would there still be God without Mrs. God?

My answer to the question asked in the title of this blog, is there would not! The tiny sculptures pictured above were found in Israel and help us answer that question as they may very well be early images of … Continue reading

I’m on the Ancient Alien Panel at Conscious Life Expo!

I am appearing at Conscious Life Expo LAX Hilton, Saturday, February 20, 2016 9am to 11 am! See https://ey283.isrefer.com/go/2016CLE/tangokitties/ I am very excited to share that once again this year I will be appearing on the ‘Ancient Alien Panel’ at … Continue reading

I will be on the Ancient Alien Panel at Conscious Life Expo!

I hope everyone will come out and join us for this amazing panel! We had a great time last year and now that I am done with surgeries,  & chemo and now doing my immunotherapy nearly every month in Grand … Continue reading

Asherah, Part II: The serpent’s bride

Queen of Heaven

Continued from Asherah, Part I

——————————————————————————————–

Is the world good, or bad? Who made us, and why? These are some of the questions ancient myths and religions attempt to answer.  And the answers matter. A belief in a goddess who is Mother Nature personified is different from a belief in a jealous and vengeful warrior creator. It’s different because it shapes how we feel about the world, and what we do while we’re in it. When the writers and compilers of our historic religion decided to edit out the Hebrew Goddess Asherah, they changed how we see the world.  They changed us and, so, they changed our world.

Eve and the Serpent

Some of the Bible’s most devout readers seem unaware of the impossibility of literal belief in its accounts.  Take creation, for example. The account of humankind’s creation by the Elohim  (translated God, but technically a plural word)…

View original post 3,147 more words

Mother of Earth and Sky

Queen of Heaven


Many people believe the ubiquitous feminine, often pregnant figurines found throughout Paleolithic and Neolithic sites in ancient Europe and the Middle East represented Mother Earth, out of which are born the plants and animals and people which are her children, but the myths of her successors in early historic times suggest we may be thinking too small.

It has been popular since the days of the Renaissance to believe that goddesses always represent the earth and moon in a complementary role to gods of sky and sun. But as the image of the ancient Egyptian Goddess Nut (pictured above) shows us, the Heavens were once thought of as ruled over by the feminine aspect of the divine.

In more recent history, many have attempted to bring back a more recent Goddess, aligned with earth and moon, and mated to a God of the sky. It isn’t hard to see why…

View original post 1,017 more words

Star of the Sea

Queen of Heaven

Aphrodite, Goddess of Love, the most beautiful of all the goddesses of Greece has an unusual origin.  She was born out of the penis of the sky when it fell into the sea. The penis in question belonged to Ouranos, the deity who was the personified sky, and it landed in the ocean not at all by chance. It was cut off by his son Cronus, who subsequently became the ruler of all things. (Cronus would later be deposed by his own son Zeus.) Leave it to the ancient Greeks to add an element of disturbing violence to an otherwise perfect metaphor.  Take out the dis-membering aspect, however, and we are left with a gorgeous image of feminine beauty, power, and love rising out of the sea.  In Botticelli’s archetypal image of the scene she sails to the shore of Cyprus upon a clam shell. But if her birth is…

View original post 1,223 more words

The Maiden Warrior and the Sun Goddess in the Epic of Baal

Queen of Heaven

Historical context: Canaanite deities and the Hebrew Bible

If you’ve ever cringed a little with a superstitious fear that uttering blasphemy might get you struck by lightning, you’re recalling God as Baal, who commanded thunder in his role as Storm God of the Canaanites; if you picture God in the shining sky with clouds under his feet, you are also recalling Baal, whose primary epithet was Rider on the Clouds. En route to becoming the only God, the God of the Old Testament borrowed these characteristics from his chief rival Baal. If you are envisioning God as an old man with a beard, however, and as ruler and king of, well, everything, you are recalling another ancient Canaanite God, El, who was the Father God.  The old, bearded man on his throne in the clouds, dispensing lightning as punishment is a composite image taken from both the Canaanite Gods El…

View original post 2,174 more words

Asherah, Part III: The Lion Lady

Queen of Heaven

The lion rider:

These days a naked lady holding a snake and riding a lion is not the first image which comes to mind when the word “holy” is spoken. However, that is exactly the title of the goddess at the center of the picture above. This particular example is Egyptian, but this is a Canaanite (pre-Israelite) goddess from the Bronze Age, who is depicted much the same way throughout the region all the way up to Syria in that time period.  She is labeled Qadesh (Qudshu), which means “the Holy One.” Who is she?  Some say an as yet unknown deity whose name is Qadesh. Most, however, assume this is an epithet of one of the major Canaanite goddesses.  She might be Astarte (Ashtart, biblical Ashtoreth), the western variant of Babylonian Ishtar, goddess of the planet Venus (a.k.a. the Morning and Evening Star) and the Goddess of Love and…

View original post 1,246 more words

Asherah, Part I: The lost bride of Yahweh

Queen of Heaven

They worshiped Her under every green tree, according to the Hebrew Bible (what Christians call the Old Testament).  The Bible also tells us Her image was to be found for years in the temple of Solomon, where the women wove hangings for Her.  In temple and forest grove, Her image was apparently made of wood, since monotheistic reformers demanded it be chopped down and burned.  It appears to have been a manmade object, but one carved of a tree and perhaps the image was a stylized tree of some kind.

The archaelogical record suggests that Asherah was the Mother Goddess of Israel, the Wife of God, according to William Dever, who has unearthed many clues to her identity. She was worshiped, apparently throughout the time Israel stood as a nation.  In many homes, images like the one above decorated household shrines.

Who was She, this lost Goddess of the Hebrews?…

View original post 1,853 more words